Delight Your Valentine with these Perfect Pairings

Posted on February 09, 2016 by Don Roden | 0 comments

You and your Valentine make an outstanding couple. Likewise, the ingredients in the following recipes can certainly stand alone, but when brought together make for one stellar dish. 

STEAK + FOIS GRAS 
This is a marriage made in heaven between the richness of the fois gras and the savoriness of a perfectly cooked steak. You will not be disappointed. Try Hangar for a variation on the usual filet.

Tournedos Rossini from NYT Cooking


SCALLOPS + BACON
Sometimes the obvious choice is right under your nose. This pairing has been around forever, but is so simple we usually dismiss it. The sweetness of the scallops and the smokiness of the bacon were made for each other.

Bacon Wrapped Scallops from Primal Palate


CHICKEN + WINE
We know what you are thinking, "chicken for a special occasion?!" But you need to trust the French. The French know love. Slow braising a succulent, free-range chicken in a good red wine and brandy transforms this dish into something seriously seductive.

Coq au Vin from the Barefoot Contessa


FILET + LOBSTER
This pairing is a classic, like red lipstick and a crisp white dress shirt. This is by far our most popular order every Valentine's Day. Any why not? It's straightforward and luxurious, plus a breeze to prepare. Both the filet and lobster tail can be tossed on the grill and done in a jiffy. This is low-maintenance perfection.

To take this pairing to the next level, top both with a rich herbed butter.
Herbed Butter Recipe from the Kitchn


The Organic Butcher has everything you need to create the perfect Valentine dinner. We are happy to suggest wine pairings and have a wide selection of cheeses and chocolates.

Posted in aphrodisiac, Beef, Dinner, Filet, Free Range, Grass-Fed, Grilling, Holiday Items, langoustine, lobster, New York Strip Steak, Pasture-Raised, Recipes, scallops, Valentine's Day, Wagyu

Combat the Cold With A Warm Yet Light Cioppino

Posted on January 06, 2016 by Don Roden | 0 comments

It's January, the winter chill has finally set in, and nothing sounds better than curling up with a hearty, filling stew. Don't sacrifice your New Year's resolutions just yet. Try this satisfying and light Cioppino instead of something that will weigh you down.

Cioppino is an Italian-American fish stew that originated in San Francisco, California. Originally it was made on boats while out at sea and later became a staple in Italian restaurants. 

You can add all sorts of seafood to this stew — clams, mussels, shrimp, white fishes, salmon, octopus — you name it. Serve it with white wine and some crusty bread to sop up the flavorful broth.

Ingredients
3 tablespoons olive oil
1 large fennel bulb, thinly sliced
1 onion, chopped
3 large shallots, chopped
2 teaspoons salt
4 large garlic cloves, finely chopped
3/4 teaspoon dried crushed red pepper flakes, plus more to taste
1/4 cup tomato paste
1 (28-ounce) can diced tomatoes in juice
1 1/2 cups dry white wine
5 cups fish stock
1 bay leaf
1 pound clams, scrubbed
1 pound mussels, scrubbed, debearded
1 pound uncooked large shrimp, peeled and deveined
1 1/2 pounds assorted firm-fleshed fish fillets such as halibut or salmon, cut into 2-inch chunks

Directions
Heat the oil in a very large pot over medium heat. Add the fennel, onion, shallots, and salt and saute until the onion is translucent, about 10 minutes. Add the garlic and 3/4 teaspoon of red pepper flakes, and saute 2 minutes. Stir in the tomato paste. Add tomatoes with their juices, wine, fish stock and bay leaf. Cover and bring to a simmer. Reduce the heat to medium-low. Cover and simmer until the flavors blend, about 30 minutes.

Add the clams and mussels to the cooking liquid. Cover and cook until the clams and mussels begin to open, about 5 minutes. Add the shrimp and fish. Simmer gently until the fish and shrimp are just cooked through, and the clams are completely open, stirring gently, about 5 minutes longer (discard any clams and mussels that do not open). Season the soup, to taste, with more salt and red pepper flakes.

Ladle the soup into bowls and serve.

Posted in Cooking Instructions, Dinner, Fish, Gluten-Free, langoustine, lobster, Paleo, Recipes, Salmon, scallops, Sea Bass, Seafood

Arctic Char — A Delicious Alternative to Wild Salmon

Posted on November 12, 2015 by Don Roden | 0 comments

As the season for wild-caught salmon comes to a close, you might be wondering what alternatives are out there. What fish is comparable in texture, flavor and healthy oils? 

Well, we have the just the fish for you! The Organic Butcher is now carrying responsibly and sustainably farm-raised Arctic Char.

Arctic Char has a distinct light, sweet flavor and firm pink flesh that is similar to salmon, though milder. It is nutrient-rich and an excellent source of heart-healthy Omega-3 fatty acids. 

If you are turned off by farm-raised fish, know that the environmentally friendly method used to farm Arctic Char is completely different than farmed salmon. The Monterey Bay Aquarium Seafood Watch gives Arctic Char a “Best Choice” eco-rating as opposed to Salmon which ranges from the lesser "Good Alternative" to "No, Thanks" ratings. We are careful to source our Arctic Char from responsible farmers.

If you have never had Arctic Char, you are in for a treat. It's mild taste will appeal to a wide range of palates.


ARCTIC CHAR WITH CHARMOULA (Food & Wine)

This roasted garlic charmoula — a classic North African marinade and sauce packed with fresh herbs and spices — is excellent with a rich fish, such as arctic char or salmon.

INGREDIENTS
Four 5-ounce, skin-on Arctic Char fillets
3 unpeeled garlic cloves
1/3 cup plus 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
1/4 cup flat-leaf parsley leaves
1/4 cup cilantro leaves
2 tablespoons chopped green olives
1 tablespoons fresh lemon juice
1/4 teaspoon ground cumin
1/4 teaspoon paprika
Kosher salt
Pepper

INSTRUCTIONS
In a small skillet, toast the garlic over moderate heat, stirring occasionally, until the skins blacken, 7 to 8 minutes. Let cool slightly; discard the skins. 

In a food processor, puree 1/3 cup of the oil, the garlic, parsley, cilantro, olives, lemon juice, cumin and paprika until smooth. Transfer the charmoula to a bowl and season with salt. 

In a large nonstick skillet, heat the remaining 2 tablespoons of oil. Season the fish with salt and pepper and place it skin side down in the skillet. Cook the fish over moderately high heat until the skin is golden, about 3 minutes. Flip the fish and cook just until it flakes easily, 2 to 3 minutes. Drain briefly on paper towels. Serve the fish with the charmoula. 

 

Posted in Arctic Char, Dinner, Fish, Gluten-Free, Paleo, Recipes, Seafood

Weeknight Meal: 5 Ingredient Honey-Mustard Chicken

Posted on October 31, 2015 by Don Roden | 0 comments

School is in full-swing and evenings are jam-packed with sports, band practice, homework, etc. The last thing you need is to prepare a complicated dinner that uses every dish in the kitchen and ends up being something the kids won't eat.

We present your new favorite weeknight meal — 5 Ingredient Honey-Mustard Chicken!

Serves: 4-6
Time: 55 mins (10 mins prep + 45 mins cook)

Ingredients
1/4 to 1/3 cup smooth Dijon mustard
1/4 to 1/3 cup honey
1 Tbsp olive oil
2-3 pounds chicken thighs, legs or breasts
2 sprigs rosemary (or a generous sprinkling of dried rosemary)
Salt
Freshly ground black pepper

Instructions
Preheat the oven to 350°F (180 C). In a medium bowl, whisk together the mustard, honey, and olive oil. Add a pinch of salt and taste. Add more salt and mustard until you get the flavor where you want it.

Salt the chicken lightly and lay the pieces skin-side up in a shallow casserole dish. Add rosemary springs. Cook until the skin is golden and crispy. Spoon the honey mustard sauce over the chicken. 

Serve with greens and wild rice, or keep it paleo with cauliflower rice.

Posted in Chicken, Dinner, Fall Recipes, Gluten-Free, Paleo, Pasture-Raised, Poultry, Recipes

Fall Recipe: Duck Confit with a Fig and Red Wine Sauce

Posted on September 22, 2015 by Don Roden | 0 comments

This week's featured fall recipe is a simple duck confit. This version is pared down from the original, but still requires a bit of time (the legs are cured for 24 hours, and then cooked for about 3 ½ hours). In this recipe the duck legs cook in their own rendered fat, rather than in quarts of additional fat. For someone who has never made duck confit, this will make prep and clean up a breeze. 

Duck Confit with a Fig and Red Wine Sauce

Ingredients
1 ½ teaspoons kosher salt
1 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
½ teaspoon dried thyme
1 bay leaf, crumbled
8 Moulard duck legs (about 4 pounds total), rinsed and patted dry but not trimmed
12 fresh figs, halved (dried will work if soaked in water overnight)
2 cups red wine, such as Barolo

Preparation
1. In a small bowl, combine salt, pepper, thyme and bay leaf pieces. Sprinkle duck generously with mixture. Place duck legs in a pan in one layer. Cover tightly with plastic wrap and refrigerate for 24 hours.

2. The next day, heat oven to 325 degrees. Place duck legs, fat side down, in a large ovenproof skillet, with legs fitting snugly in a single layer (you may have to use two skillets or cook them in batches). Heat duck legs over medium-high heat until fat starts to render. When there is about 1/4 inch of rendered fat in pan, about 20 minutes, flip duck legs, cover pan with foil, and place it in oven. If you have used two pans, transfer duck and fat to a roasting pan, cover with foil and place in oven.

3. Roast legs for 2 hours, then remove foil and continue roasting until duck is golden brown, about 1 hour more. Remove duck from fat; reserve fat for sauce.

4. Add the figs and wine to roasting pan with remaining duck fat. Heat over medium until the wine has evaporated by half and the figs have softened, scraping any crusty bits from the pan into the wine.

5. Arrange duck legs on a plate and serve with the wine sauce.

Posted in Cooking Instructions, Dinner, Duck, Fall Recipes, Paleo, Recipes, Wine

Grilled Berkshire Heritage Pork Chops: Extremely Flavorful & Full of Fat (in a good way!)

Posted on May 01, 2015 by Don Roden | 0 comments

Tired of chicken breast for dinner but not in the mood for red meat? Throw our Berkshire Heritage pork chops on the grill for an easy, but over-the-top delicious meal.

Berkshire pork is a heritage breed of pig, which was discovered over 300 years ago in Berkshire County in the United Kingdom. Berkshire pork is renowned for its richness, texture, marbling, juiciness, tenderness and overall depth of flavor. It is thought by many to be the Kobe beef of pork. It is said to have a very specific taste, not generic and bland or mild like regular pork.

Berkshire pork is a richer pink, almost red color and heavily marbled. They were specially bred for the King of England for his own personal meat supply, because of the excellence in the meat.

To take this pork to the next level, rub both sides with our Butcher Shop Steak Rub. For medium-thick pork chops sear both sides of the chops briefly over high heat to get a nice crust and then move them to an area of less intense heat, cover the grill, and let them cook through.  Or leave a little pink inside for the perfect chop.

 Served with an arugula salad and a nice vinaigrette, and you've got yourself a meal fit for a king!

Posted in Berkshire Pork, Butcher Shop Rubs, Cooking Instructions, Dinner, Gluten-Free, Grilling, Organic, Paleo, Pork

Grilled, Butterflied Chicken — It's What's For Dinner.

Posted on April 24, 2015 by Don Roden | 0 comments

A butterflied (or spatchcocked) chicken is simply one that has had it's backbone removed and has been split open. Butterflying a chicken cuts down on cooking time, allows the meat to cook more evenly and exposes more skin, which crisps up nicely at higher temperatures.

We are happy to butterfly our free-range and organic chickens upon request. We recommend seasoning the chicken with one of our Dizzy Pig rubs or our newest product, Amola Bacon Salt. 

Once seasoned, place on grill breast side down over flames at 350 degrees for ten minutes, flip and cook an additional 30-40 minutes over indirect heat.  If cooking on the Big Green Egg we recommend smoking chicken over indirect heat at 250 degrees for about an hour and a half. 

Try Dizzy Pig rubs on all sorts of meats. They are particularly amazing on chicken and are gluten- and MSG-free. 

We are very excited to offer Amola Bacon Salt. Amola produces globally inspired infused salts. Their Bacon Salt is made with real heritage breed pork for a pure and intense flavor. Try it on chicken, popcorn, eggs, sautéed green vegetables or anything else you want to add that smoky bacon goodness too. It is especially good with dark chocolate. Let us know what you think!

Posted in Bacon Salt, BBQ, Big Green Egg, Chicken, Cooking Instructions, Dinner, Dizzy Pig, Free Range, Gluten-Free, Grilling, New Products, Organic, Paleo

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