Hickory Maple Brined Berkshire Pork Chops

Posted on November 10, 2016 by Don Roden | 0 comments

Falling Bark Farm’s local, hand-crafted Hickory Maple Syrup is the perfect accompaniment for our Heritage Breed Berkshire Pork Chops. Berkshire is to pork what Kobe is to beef.

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Posted in Berkshire Pork, Pasture-Raised, Pork, Recipes

Delight Your Valentine with these Perfect Pairings

Posted on February 09, 2016 by Don Roden | 0 comments

You and your Valentine make an outstanding couple. Likewise, the ingredients in the following recipes can certainly stand alone, but when brought together make for one stellar dish. 

STEAK + FOIS GRAS 
This is a marriage made in heaven between the richness of the fois gras and the savoriness of a perfectly cooked steak. You will not be disappointed. Try Hangar for a variation on the usual filet.

Tournedos Rossini from NYT Cooking


SCALLOPS + BACON
Sometimes the obvious choice is right under your nose. This pairing has been around forever, but is so simple we usually dismiss it. The sweetness of the scallops and the smokiness of the bacon were made for each other.

Bacon Wrapped Scallops from Primal Palate


CHICKEN + WINE
We know what you are thinking, "chicken for a special occasion?!" But you need to trust the French. The French know love. Slow braising a succulent, free-range chicken in a good red wine and brandy transforms this dish into something seriously seductive.

Coq au Vin from the Barefoot Contessa


FILET + LOBSTER
This pairing is a classic, like red lipstick and a crisp white dress shirt. This is by far our most popular order every Valentine's Day. Any why not? It's straightforward and luxurious, plus a breeze to prepare. Both the filet and lobster tail can be tossed on the grill and done in a jiffy. This is low-maintenance perfection.

To take this pairing to the next level, top both with a rich herbed butter.
Herbed Butter Recipe from the Kitchn


The Organic Butcher has everything you need to create the perfect Valentine dinner. We are happy to suggest wine pairings and have a wide selection of cheeses and chocolates.

Posted in aphrodisiac, Beef, Dinner, Filet, Free Range, Grass-Fed, Grilling, Holiday Items, langoustine, lobster, New York Strip Steak, Pasture-Raised, Recipes, scallops, Valentine's Day, Wagyu

Burgers: Create Your Own Custom Grinds for Super Bowl

Posted on January 30, 2016 by Don Roden | 0 comments

Super Bowl Sunday is a week away and while it's mostly about football, we know it's really about food. If you are planning a menu for the big day but have dismissed the idea of burgers as too boring, think again! Everyone loves a good burger when done right, i.e. juicy, beefy and flavorful. We'll let you in on a little secret — the key is in the blend of meats you use.

There are wonderful variations worth exploring when it comes to selecting which cuts of beef to use for your patties. By adding different cuts you can change the flavor profile of your burger in a myriad of ways.

The key to an extremely juicy burger is to create a grind with an overall protein-to-fat ratio of 70/30 for medium-rare to medium-well and 80/20 for rare. As long as you maintain this ratio, you can experiment to your heart's content.

Some of our favorite grinds include short rib, hangar steak, and sirloin. For a smokey flavor, try adding bacon. Ask us, we are happy to suggest some creative and flavorful combinations. 


One of the most famous burgers on the scene these days is from the Charleston, South Carolina restaurant Husk. There, Chef Sean Brock has blended chuck, flank steak and bacon for a mouth-watering — yet not overly fussy — cheeseburger. The recipe is below and a complete showstopper!

Husk's Famous Cheeseburger

Ingredients (makes enough for 10 cheeseburgers)

 For the special sauce

  • 1 3/4 cups mayonnaise
  • 1 1/4 cups yellow mustard
  • 5 tablespoons ketchup
  • 1/2 cup Bread and Butter pickles, drained and cut into 1/8-inch dice
  • 1/4 cup pickled jalapeños, drained and cut into 1/8-inch dice
  •  grated zest (use a Microplane) and juice of 1 lemon
  • 1 tablespoon hot sauce
  •  Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste
  • 2 tablespoons pepper vinegar

 For the cheeseburgers

  • Custom grind of 1 (3-pound) fresh boneless chuck roast, 12 ounces fresh flank steak and 3 ounces bacon
  • 3 tablespoons unsalted butter, at room temperature
  • 10 burger buns, preferably potato rolls
  • 1 cup white onion, shaved
  • 20 slices American cheese
  • 50 Bread and Butter pickles

 

Directions

For the sauce:

  1. Combine all of the ingredients in a large container and stir together to blend well.
  2. Cover and refrigerate. (Tightly covered, the sauce will keep for up to 5 days in the refrigerator.)

For the cheeseburgers:

  1. Portion the meat mixture into twenty 3-ounce patties, about 1/2-inch thick (each burger gets 2 patties).
  2. If not cooking right away, arrange on a baking sheet, cover tightly with plastic wrap and refrigerate. (The patties can be refrigerated for up to 1 day. Remove from the refrigerator about 30 minutes before you’re ready to cook; it’s important that the patties are not ice-cold when they hit the hot pan.)
  3. Generously butter the tops and bottoms of the buns.
  4. Toast on a griddle until nice and golden brown. Reserve.
  5. Heat grill or two 12-inch cast-iron skillets until as hot as possible.
  6. Divide the patties between the two hot pans.
  7. When the patties are nice and charred, about 2 minutes, flip them over and cook to desired doneness.
  8. Place the onion slices on 10 of the patties.
  9. Place a slice of the cheese on all of the patties and allow it to melt, about 30 seconds.
  10. Stack the non-onion patties on top of the onion patties. Remove from the heat.
  11. Smear both sides of the buns with special sauce.
  12. Place 5 pickles on the bottom half of each bun. Add the burger patties and top with the top halves of the buns. Serve at once.

 

Posted in Beef, Big Green Egg, Brisket, Flank Steak, Grass-Fed, Grilling, New York Strip Steak, Pasture-Raised, Recipes, Super Bowl, Wagyu

Combat the Cold With A Warm Yet Light Cioppino

Posted on January 06, 2016 by Don Roden | 0 comments

It's January, the winter chill has finally set in, and nothing sounds better than curling up with a hearty, filling stew. Don't sacrifice your New Year's resolutions just yet. Try this satisfying and light Cioppino instead of something that will weigh you down.

Cioppino is an Italian-American fish stew that originated in San Francisco, California. Originally it was made on boats while out at sea and later became a staple in Italian restaurants. 

You can add all sorts of seafood to this stew — clams, mussels, shrimp, white fishes, salmon, octopus — you name it. Serve it with white wine and some crusty bread to sop up the flavorful broth.

Ingredients
3 tablespoons olive oil
1 large fennel bulb, thinly sliced
1 onion, chopped
3 large shallots, chopped
2 teaspoons salt
4 large garlic cloves, finely chopped
3/4 teaspoon dried crushed red pepper flakes, plus more to taste
1/4 cup tomato paste
1 (28-ounce) can diced tomatoes in juice
1 1/2 cups dry white wine
5 cups fish stock
1 bay leaf
1 pound clams, scrubbed
1 pound mussels, scrubbed, debearded
1 pound uncooked large shrimp, peeled and deveined
1 1/2 pounds assorted firm-fleshed fish fillets such as halibut or salmon, cut into 2-inch chunks

Directions
Heat the oil in a very large pot over medium heat. Add the fennel, onion, shallots, and salt and saute until the onion is translucent, about 10 minutes. Add the garlic and 3/4 teaspoon of red pepper flakes, and saute 2 minutes. Stir in the tomato paste. Add tomatoes with their juices, wine, fish stock and bay leaf. Cover and bring to a simmer. Reduce the heat to medium-low. Cover and simmer until the flavors blend, about 30 minutes.

Add the clams and mussels to the cooking liquid. Cover and cook until the clams and mussels begin to open, about 5 minutes. Add the shrimp and fish. Simmer gently until the fish and shrimp are just cooked through, and the clams are completely open, stirring gently, about 5 minutes longer (discard any clams and mussels that do not open). Season the soup, to taste, with more salt and red pepper flakes.

Ladle the soup into bowls and serve.

Posted in Cooking Instructions, Dinner, Fish, Gluten-Free, langoustine, lobster, Paleo, Recipes, Salmon, scallops, Sea Bass, Seafood

Arctic Char — A Delicious Alternative to Wild Salmon

Posted on November 12, 2015 by Don Roden | 0 comments

As the season for wild-caught salmon comes to a close, you might be wondering what alternatives are out there. What fish is comparable in texture, flavor and healthy oils? 

Well, we have the just the fish for you! The Organic Butcher is now carrying responsibly and sustainably farm-raised Arctic Char.

Arctic Char has a distinct light, sweet flavor and firm pink flesh that is similar to salmon, though milder. It is nutrient-rich and an excellent source of heart-healthy Omega-3 fatty acids. 

If you are turned off by farm-raised fish, know that the environmentally friendly method used to farm Arctic Char is completely different than farmed salmon. The Monterey Bay Aquarium Seafood Watch gives Arctic Char a “Best Choice” eco-rating as opposed to Salmon which ranges from the lesser "Good Alternative" to "No, Thanks" ratings. We are careful to source our Arctic Char from responsible farmers.

If you have never had Arctic Char, you are in for a treat. It's mild taste will appeal to a wide range of palates.


ARCTIC CHAR WITH CHARMOULA (Food & Wine)

This roasted garlic charmoula — a classic North African marinade and sauce packed with fresh herbs and spices — is excellent with a rich fish, such as arctic char or salmon.

INGREDIENTS
Four 5-ounce, skin-on Arctic Char fillets
3 unpeeled garlic cloves
1/3 cup plus 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
1/4 cup flat-leaf parsley leaves
1/4 cup cilantro leaves
2 tablespoons chopped green olives
1 tablespoons fresh lemon juice
1/4 teaspoon ground cumin
1/4 teaspoon paprika
Kosher salt
Pepper

INSTRUCTIONS
In a small skillet, toast the garlic over moderate heat, stirring occasionally, until the skins blacken, 7 to 8 minutes. Let cool slightly; discard the skins. 

In a food processor, puree 1/3 cup of the oil, the garlic, parsley, cilantro, olives, lemon juice, cumin and paprika until smooth. Transfer the charmoula to a bowl and season with salt. 

In a large nonstick skillet, heat the remaining 2 tablespoons of oil. Season the fish with salt and pepper and place it skin side down in the skillet. Cook the fish over moderately high heat until the skin is golden, about 3 minutes. Flip the fish and cook just until it flakes easily, 2 to 3 minutes. Drain briefly on paper towels. Serve the fish with the charmoula. 

 

Posted in Arctic Char, Dinner, Fish, Gluten-Free, Paleo, Recipes, Seafood

Weeknight Meal: 5 Ingredient Honey-Mustard Chicken

Posted on October 31, 2015 by Don Roden | 0 comments

School is in full-swing and evenings are jam-packed with sports, band practice, homework, etc. The last thing you need is to prepare a complicated dinner that uses every dish in the kitchen and ends up being something the kids won't eat.

We present your new favorite weeknight meal — 5 Ingredient Honey-Mustard Chicken!

Serves: 4-6
Time: 55 mins (10 mins prep + 45 mins cook)

Ingredients
1/4 to 1/3 cup smooth Dijon mustard
1/4 to 1/3 cup honey
1 Tbsp olive oil
2-3 pounds chicken thighs, legs or breasts
2 sprigs rosemary (or a generous sprinkling of dried rosemary)
Salt
Freshly ground black pepper

Instructions
Preheat the oven to 350°F (180 C). In a medium bowl, whisk together the mustard, honey, and olive oil. Add a pinch of salt and taste. Add more salt and mustard until you get the flavor where you want it.

Salt the chicken lightly and lay the pieces skin-side up in a shallow casserole dish. Add rosemary springs. Cook until the skin is golden and crispy. Spoon the honey mustard sauce over the chicken. 

Serve with greens and wild rice, or keep it paleo with cauliflower rice.

Posted in Chicken, Dinner, Fall Recipes, Gluten-Free, Paleo, Pasture-Raised, Poultry, Recipes

GUEST POST: Home-curing Duck Prosciutto

Posted on October 01, 2015 by Don Roden | 1 comment

Friend of the store and loyal customer, Sean Vineyard (@chezsean85), was gracious enough to detail how he makes duck prosciutto at home with very little equipment. Read on and get inspired!


HOME-CURED DUCK PROSCIUTTO
Words and photos by Sean Vineyard

Coppa. Bresaola. Lomo. Panchetta. Prosciutto. American’s love cured meats, and with good reason; we’ve been curing meats for centuries. What once was done out of necessity as a means of preservation is now done out of a passion for rich, concentrated, meaty deliciousness. Why did we stop curing meats? Mostly because of refrigeration, but ultimately it’s the same reason we no longer have cassette players in our cars. Something better came along. 

Many people now associate charcuterie with low production artisans, tucked away in the back of a small store-front, legs of prosciutto hanging from the window, skillfully stuffing natural casings with pork, fat, wine, fennel, pepper, and garlic to make finocchiona salami. So, what if I told you that you could make cured meats at home? Most people don’t believe me. What if I told you that you could do it in less than three weeks, start-to-finish? Usually people look at me as though I’ve proven string theory when I tell them that. 

The least complicated of all of the variety of charcuterie is definitely whole muscle cured meats. That is to say, essentially everything less salami and cured sausages. Of the whole muscle cured meats, duck prosciutto is the easiest way to gain entry into the vastly addicting world of home curing and that is largely because it is quick. You can see results in a couple of weeks and adjust recipes to your liking instead of 6-18 months if you were to cure a whole hog leg to make traditional prosciutto. Okay enough talking, let’s get started – trust me – those who know me know I love to talk and will gladly do so if not intervened. 

What You Will Need
2-3 duck breasts
¼ cup juniper berries
2 TBSP peppercorns (mixed black, green, red, and white if you can)
2 TBSP fennel seed
2-3 whole star anise
4 bay leaves
4 cups of sea salt
Light vinegar (not distilled) or white wine for rinsing
Cheese cloth
Butchers twine

How to Select Your Duck
Just as with any dish you make, selecting the right ingredients is one of the most essential parts. No matter how good of a Chef or cook you are, you can’t turn bad products into something that tastes good. My recommendation is create a relationship with your grocer. Know your butcher. And if you can, know your farmer. 

When selecting which type of duck breast to use I thought it best to ask The Organic Butcher, Don Roden, what his thoughts are on the subject. Don says that there are three widely available breeds of duck available. Those being Peking, Moulard, and Muscovy. If anyone has ever eaten at a decent Chinese restaurant, you’re probably quite familiar with Peking duck. Peking duck has a lower fat to flesh ratio making it the least ideal for curing. Remember, fat is good! And truthfully, if you don’t like fat, we can’t be friends. Moulard is the Rolls Royce of duck breasts. Rich, fatty, deep in color and flavor. But just like with a Rolls Royce, they are expensive. They are well worth the price but certainly not the best option to try out your hand in curing. That leaves the Muscovy. Don says the Muscovy has the best fat to flesh ratio, portion sizes, and flavor, and they are very affordable. 

Once you have decided the type of duck to buy, you need to select your meat. Freshness is imperative in curing meats because any ‘funk’ will be exacerbated by the curing process and while stinky cheeses always have a place in my fridge, stinky meats are not good eats! There are three senses that are important to remember when selecting your meat. Sight, feel, and smell. First, you want to make sure that the duck is not greying along the flesh or yellowing along the fat or skin. Second, you want to make sure that the duck is wet but not slimy. Last, and probably the most important, make sure that the duck smells relatively neutral. Yes, any good butcher will let you smell their products! As strange as it may seem, do it. It should smell like raw meat, not like a trash can. If it’s not pleasurable to your nose, it won’t be pleasurable to your stomach. 

Preparing Your Cure
The cure is a very important part of the process. This is what draws out the moisture in the meat. The moisture, being a veritable bacteria playground, is not something that we want a lot of. In fact, the curing and aging process should reduce the overall weight of your meat by about 25-30%. The curing process is also what imparts a lot of the flavor to the meats based on what spices you put in the cure. While I have my favorite spices, I recommend that first-timers use just salt. By doing that you are going to really taste the meat itself and then you can figure out which spices you want to add based on your preferences and not just listening to what I say works. Create your own cure! That’s part of the fun.

My basic ratio for my cures are 1 part spices to 3 or 4 parts salt (depending on how thick the meat is and how much of the flavor of the spices you want in the meat). The key thing to remember when making your cure, regardless of what spices you use, is to use whole spices and toast them! Toasting them brings out the oils of the spices and brings an added layer of complexity to the flavor. To toast your spices, places your whole spices in a pan on medium heat. You will want to nearly constantly stir the spices for 5-6 minutes until they begin turning golden brown on the outside and become very fragrant. Put them into a spice grinder (or you can grind them by hand) and blend them all together. Then mix the spices into the cure. Let the cure cool down. You do not want to bring any heat to the raw meat. I will often times put the cure mixture into the fridge for an hour or so to let it cool. 

Curing and Aging
To begin the curing process, place about half of the cure in the bottom of a baking dish. I generally prefer glass. You want to make sure there is at least one inch of cure on the bottom of the dish. Place your duck breast on the mixture. You will see some recipes tell you to score the skin and fat. Truthfully, I never do. It makes the duck too salty and makes it more challenging to slice afterwards. Not to mention it doesn’t look as uniform when you slice it. It’s all about the presentation! You will also see recipes that tell you to place it skin-side down. I have never seen any difference in taste or texture with doing it skin or flesh side down so you do whatever your heart desires. 

You want to make sure that your duck breasts are spaced about an inch apart to ensure that the cure gets in contact with every bit of the duck. Pour your remaining mixture over the meat (again, you should have at least an inch of mixture on top of your duck). Cover the whole thing and put it in the fridge for between 2 and 3 days depending on the size of your duck breasts. I will usually stick with 48 hours unless they are particularly large. 

After the two days, take the duck out of the fridge and remove it from the cure. The duck breasts should be firm but not hard, a little smaller in size, and slightly darker in color since much of the moisture has been removed. You’ll want to remove any excess cure by pouring a little vinegar over it. I usually use a white wine or apple cider vinegar. You can also use white wine if you have some lying around and for some strange reason you don’t want to drink it. 

Now it’s time to wrap it, tie it, and hang it. You wrap the duck in cheese cloth to prevent direct air contact when it is drying/aging. Direct air contact will dry out the outside of the flesh too quickly and it may prevent the inside of the duck from properly drying. Take your cheese cloth and lay it on a flat surface. Place the duck at one edge in the center. Roll it (like you would a sandwich) and about half way through fold in the ends and then continue rolling it. Use the butchers twine to tie the duck. It is easiest to YouTube videos on “how to tie a roast” to show you how to properly tie the duck.

It’s hard to explain how to properly tie without a video. Make sure to leave a loop of twine at the top to hang it. For the drying process you can get an S-hook or a suction cup hook from the hardware store and place it in your fridge. Unless you want to go all out and build an in home curing fridge like I did. Hang the duck and place a Tupperware container underneath it filled with salt water. It should be about the same as ocean water. This will create a micro humid climate since refrigerators are notoriously dry and that is not what we want. Make sure that the duck breasts are not touching each other or anything else. If they touch, the contact points could create warm, high humidity areas that could grow bad mold. You want to keep the duck hanging for two weeks. After that you’re ready to eat it!

Slicing and Serving
You have a couple of options for slicing and endless options for serving. You want to cut the duck prosciutto paper thing. If you are have a meat slicer at your house, you are already far more prepared than most. If you don’t have a meat slicer, a very sharp slicing knife will work just fine. I find it easiest to lay the duck fat side down if slicing by hand. The key is to go slow and take as few strokes as possible when slicing. 

For serving, I love the duck prosciutto just like it is. No accompaniment, no accoutrement, just duck. But you can pair it with figs and bread or crisp it up and put it in a salad. Whatever peaks your interest, do it.

Posted in Cooking Instructions, Cured Meats, Customer Recipes, Duck, Fall Recipes, Gluten-Free, Home-Curing, Paleo, Recipes

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